Linux Install Lesson Plan

From Hive76 Wiki
Revision as of 16:00, 8 February 2011 by Steph (talk | contribs) (Created page with '*9-9:30: Show up, get ready, hook up M's laptop to projector as people show up: Start starting back-ups *<= 10:20: Go-around with names, pronouns, experience, intentions *Fini…')
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
  • 9-9:30: Show up, get ready, hook up M's laptop to projector

as people show up: Start starting back-ups

  • <= 10:20: Go-around with names, pronouns, experience, intentions
  • Finish starting back-ups
  • What's Linux (S)

    ** To introduce the OS concept, ask people what programs they use, then to name some computer hardware.  Then explain that an operating system is the glue in between.     ** Windows, OSX, Macintosh, UNIX are others.     ** An operating system is the software that acts as glue between your computer's hardware and the programs that you use on it.  It's the software that, for example, links the physical movement of a mouse with the action of moving a cursor and clicking inside a program.     ** Other common operating systems are Windows, OSX/Macintosh, and UNIX.

  • What's FOSS (M)
  • Generate list of things to do on a computer, proprietary and non-proprietary apps for them
  • Implications of using proprietary/open software (M)
  • Differences b/w distros, and why we chose Ubuntu (S)

    ** http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major     ** What we call “Linux”, the part that has to stay the same in order to be called Linux, is actually a pretty small piece of code called the “kernel”.  Different flavors of Linux are called “distributions.” Distributions have different looks and feels, and have different ways of doing tasks like updating software.  Some of the differences are subtle, and some are pretty stark.     ** Names that you might have heard are Ubuntu, Debian, Red Hat, Fedora, Gentoo, CentOS, Suse, Puppy Linux, and lots of others.     ** We chose Ubuntu because it's very popular, and it's popular because it's generally pretty easy to use and compatible with a lot of hardware. Also, being popular means that there are lots of people on the user forums, so it's easy to find someone who had the same problem you're having, and easy to ask for help.

  • What happens in install/what can go wrong (S)

    ** hardware incompatibility w/ boot disk     ** installer buggy     ** partitioning problems     ** multiples of devices     ** partition not big enough     ** passwords     ** firewall     ** internet     ** drivers

  • Quick mention of what you can do if you don't want to install at this point

    ** Explain what a live cd is     ** Suggest installing FOSS software     ** Team up with another student To do:     * Make install cds: 1.5 n (where n=number of students signed up), half 32-bit and half 64-bit, plus some blanks (S)     * Check on hive stickers (S)  There are some on the shelf in the back.  Give to each student     * Make handout: agenda annotated resource list with troubleshooting, business models, philosophizing, book recommendations (M)     * Print final handout on Sat evening/Sun morning (M or S)     * print some zines (M)     * food budgeting (S)